Got Questions?

It is unlikely that a healthy, adult, pet dog will develop the severe and deadly form of canine influenza virus.

Overall, canine influenza is no more a threat to your dog than an infection from Bordetella (the bacteria associated with “kennel cough”). While it’s true that about 80% of all dogs exposed to the virus will become infected, the vast majority of these experience mild symptoms similar to a human head cold which resolve with simple supportive care. About 20% of those dogs exposed will clear the infection without any signs of illness.

Infected dogs may develop such clinical signs as coughing, sneezing, lethargy, decreased appetite, fever and a runny nose.

Often mild symptoms such as coughing and sneezing can resolve themselves after just a few days. If treatment is warranted, then supportive care consisting of antibiotics, and possibly intravenous fluids and hospitalization, would be indicated. A very small percentage of dogs can develop pneumonia, which requires more aggressive therapy.

How is canine influenza spread?
Canine influenza is very easily spread from dog to dog. An infected dog can spread the virus for a day or so before acting sick. This makes it very difficult to prevent and stop outbreaks. Anything the dog coughs on or licks (bowls, blankets, toys etc) might also spread infection. People can accidentally spread canine flu when they touch an infected dog and then touch other dogs or objects before washing their hands.

What dogs are at risk?
Shelter dogs and racing greyhounds are at a greater risk of contracting the severe form of canine influenza, due to the close proximity of their crates and the increased stress levels these dogs experience. This also applies to dogs staying at a boarding kennel or participating in dog shows. As with human flu, the very young or very old are also at increased risk.

In its severe form, canine influenza is characterized by a rapid onset of hemorrhagic pneumonia with high fevers, difficulty breathing and coughing up blood. In these cases death can occur within four to six hours of presentation. Again, it is rare that a healthy, adult, pet dog will develop the severe form of this viral infection. It is important to remember that, even in these very high-risk populations, the mortality rate is only 5-8%. That means that almost all dogs affected do recover with treatment.

Can I prevent my dog from getting the flu?

    1. You can help protect your dog with these simple preventive steps:

    2. At the dog park or doggie day care, avoid any contact with dogs that are coughing and sneezing.
    3. Keep a watchful eye out: If your dog starts coughing or sneezing and acting lethargic, see your veterinarian to discuss diagnostic and treatment options.
    4. If your dog shows any of these upper respiratory signs, limit your dog’s socializing — steer clear of the dog park and doggie day care until these symptoms are gone to avoid exposing other dogs.
    5. If you anticipate boarding your dog, you may want to consider vaccinating, especially if your dog has underlying issues, is very young or is a “senior citizen.”

Should my dog be vaccinated?
If you anticipate boarding your dog, you may want to consider vaccinating, especially if your dog has underlying issues, is very young or is a “senior citizen”. These dogs are at greater risk.

Be aware that the vaccine may not prevent your pet from becoming infected if exposed to the virus. However, it has been shown that the vaccination will reduce the severity of clinical signs.

Given these facts, we feel that if your dog is in a high risk group, strong consideration should be given to vaccinating against canine influenza.

If I choose to vaccinate, how soon should it be done before my dog is near other dogs?
If you decide vaccinate, please note that the vaccine requires two initial vaccinations, 2 – 4 weeks apart, to establish protection. Significant protection is likely not established until 7-10 days after the second immunization. Therefore, you must plan ahead for the vaccine to provide any preventative effect.

If you expect to board your dog(s) regularly, and you choose to vaccinate against influenza, you might consider adding it to your dog’s annual vaccine protocol. Because we will be evaluating each dog’s potential risk individually, be sure to discuss this with the veterinarian.

Why should I consider Pet Health Insurance?
We all want what is best for our pets, and there are incredible veterinary services to choose from today. By taking full advantage of these care options, your pet can live a longer, healthier life. Insurance can help cover your costs for care, and may enable you to choose more complete care. When you do a little research, you will soon see that pet insurance is very different from our health insurance, and does not have the same disadvantages!

Most pets will encounter one or more major medical issues in their lifetimes, so pet insurance warrants serious consideration. For detailed information, visit the website of companies you are considering, or talk with a rep from that company.

Not All Pet Insurance Companies Are the Same….
The following information outlines key points pertaining to pet health insurance, and serves as a guide for some of the questions to ask when considering a pet insurance plan. We have researched several companies, and have found many variations. What will fit the needs of one pet or owner might not work for another. To help you in your decision, we have outlined some important points to consider and research when looking into insurance.
Pet Health Insurance compared to human health insurance and HMOs:

  • They are designed very differently. Pet insurance is more like auto or dental insurance, and is often endorsed by general insurance companies.
  • The owner pays the veterinarian, and then is reimbursed by the insurance company.
  • Claim forms and the vet invoice are mailed to the insurance company; most forms are short and easy to complete
  • Most plans allow you to choose any veterinarian.

What does it cost?

  • Annual premiums vary, depending on the plan, and sometimes on the age of the pet.
  • There are copays, and usually a deductible before the insurance reimburses you.
  • Average monthly premiums for mid-range coverage illness plans – $15 – 35 per month
  • Average monthly premiums for wellness plans – $10 – 30 per month
  • Some companies give multi pet discounts; some companies offer a 30 day free trial.
Deductibles:
  • All illness and accident plans have deductibles
  • Some companies allow you to choose the amount – from $50 – $500.
  • Generally, the higher the deductible, the lower the premium.
  • Some deductibles are per incident or illness, some are per year.
Reimbursement-There are two types, depending on the company:
  • Reimbursement based on % of actual vet invoice – usually 80-90%
  • Based on benefit schedule (pre-determined “acceptable” vet fee schedule)

Typical Exclusions:

  • Cosmetic procedures (ear crops; tail docks; dewclaws, though not necessarily cosmetic)
  • Pregnancy
  • OFA and health certifications
  • Pre-existing conditions
  • Anal glands
  • Parasites – prevention and treatment, internal and external
  • Sometimes inherited conditions
  • Congenital problems – present at birth
  • Prescription foods
  • At least one company excludes prescriptions (requires a separate rider)
  • Medical conditions that are common in certain breeds are often excluded – the insurance company will provide specifics if you ask.
  • ** Some companies offer add-on riders to cover some of the above conditions.
  • ** Some companies will provide limited “flat rate” coverage for the above conditions.

Wellness exams, vaccinations, etc.

  • Staying current on wellness exams and vaccines can help prevent or lessen the severity of illness.
  • Most companies offer separate “wellness” coverage for a separate premium.
  • Partial reimbursement is the general rule (40-70%) with no deductibles.
  • Disciplined owners can also save for these procedures, since, unlike illnesses, owners can plan for this expense.
Average Waiting Periods:
There is always a waiting period after signing up, which varies with the company.

  • · Cruciate repair – 6 – 12 mo.
  • · Illness – 14 – 30 days
  • · Recurring illness (e.g. ear infection or UTI)- free of the illness for 6 – 12 mo.
  • · Accident – 2 – 14 days
The bottom line: We feel pet insurance can greatly benefit your pet and his/her quality and length of life. Remember, it is primarily for unexpected expenses and can greatly reduce potential economic strain for you. For more details, we advise you to visit the websites of the companies you are considering, and then call the company with your questions.

What is involved in neutering my cat?
  • Assuming the pre-op blood work reveals no underlying problems, a pre-anesthetic injection that includes pain medication is administered.
  • A breathing mask is then placed over the cat’s face to induce and maintain full anesthesia.
  • The surgery site is clipped and aseptically prepared for surgery. At this time local anesthetic blocks are used to further prevent discomfort. All the while the heart, respiratory rate, and other vital parameters are closely monitored by a NYS licensed veterinary technician.
  • As the surgeon scrubs and “gowns up,” the patient is carefully moved to the surgery table where he is reconnected to the anesthetic monitoring equipment.
  • A small incision is made, and the surgery begins.
  • We’ll save you the details, but the appropriate organs are surgically removed.
  • After surgery completion, the patient is removed from anesthesia and transferred to the recovery area where he is closely observed until he is lying up on his chest. It is at this time that we will try to call to assure you that all has gone well, and to schedule your cat’s discharge appt.
  • When the patient is awake and able to walk, he is transferred to the hospital ward, and is frequently checked.
  • Later that day, the doctor re-examines the patient and inspects the incision.
  • As the pain medication from the morning wears off, it is determined whether an oral pain medication should be sent home with your cat.
  • It will soon be time to go home!

Why is pre-operative blood work recommended? (My cat is young and healthy.)
Pre-op blood work provides the same benefits as with human surgery. The tests check for anemia, and tell us if your cat’s organs, particularly those associated with the metabolism of the anesthetic agents, are functioning properly. If congenital or age related abnormalities are identified, anesthesia protocols can be modified. If all is normal, we have established a valuable baseline for future reference.

What pain medications will my cat receive?
Because it is not full abdominal surgery, cats recover more quickly from neutering than from spaying, and with significantly less pain. Initially, an injection of a morphine-like drug is given as part of the pre-anesthetic medication. The effect lasts approximately 12 hours. In addition, lidocaine (similar to novacaine) is injected close to the surgical site to provide a local anesthetic. That evening, when the cat is re-examined, if he seems uncomfortable he will be sent home with additional oral pain medication.

How can all this be done for such a reasonable cost?
In an effort to reduce the number of unwanted puppies and kittens, the Livonia Veterinary Hospital has subsidized the cost of your cat’s neuter. Another comparably involved surgery would certainly be more, and comparable human procedures would cost thousands more. It is important to note, however, that even with the costs reduced, your cat has received the best veterinary care possible. We perform the procedure using the highest standards available today to minimize the risk of infection and make the procedure as pain free as possible. You can be assured that high quality veterinary care is never compromised at the Livonia Veterinary Hospital.

Should I do anything special when my cat comes home?
For 2-3 days after surgery, you should keep your cat’s activity restricted, and he should not be allowed to go outdoors.

He may be a little quiet and sleep more than usual the first day or two. After all, he is recovering from surgery!

The first evening home we recommend feeding only a partial meal. Afterwards, you may feed and water your cat as usual. No special diet is required.

You should examine the incision daily. There is no need for suture removal; the small incisions heal without sutures.

We encourage you to contact us if you have any questions or concerns.

The hormonal changes that result from neutering occur over time, so typical pre-neuter behaviors, such as roaming, may still be present up to 3 months after surgery.

What is involved in neutering my cat?
    • Assuming the pre-op blood work reveals no underlying problems, a pre-anesthetic injection with pain medication is given.
    • A small area of the front leg is shaved and an IV catheter is then placed for administering fluids and medications.
    • The endotracheal (breathing) tube is placed for inhalation anesthesia.
    • As your dog’s heart and breathing are monitored by a NYS licensed veterinary technician, another clips the surgical site.
    • As the surgeon scrubs and “gowns up,” the patient is moved to the surgery table; the incision site is scrubbed and sterilized.
    • The patient is connected to a respiratory monitor, and anesthesia is adjusted and monitored.
    • A small incision is made, and the surgery begins, which takes approximately 45 minutes.
    • The testicles are surgically removed. (We’ll spare you the details here!)
    • After closing the 2 layers with absorbable suture, the patient is transferred to the observation area where he is closely watched until his endotracheal tube can be safely removed and he is in sternal recumbancy (lying up on his chest).
    • It is at this time that we usually call to assure you that all has gone well, and to schedule your dog’s discharge appt.
    • Cleaning and sterilization of the operating room and surgical instruments then begins to prepare for the next surgery.
    • When the patient is awake and able to walk, he is transferred to a hospital ward kennel, and is regularly checked.
    • Later that day, the doctor examines the patient and inspects the incision.

As the pain medication from the morning wears off, it is determined whether an oral pain medication should be sent home with your dog.
It will soon be time to go home!

Why is pre-operative blood work recommended? (My cat is young and healthy.)
Pre-op blood work provides the same benefits as with human surgery. The tests check for anemia, and tell us if your cat’s organs, particularly those associated with the metabolism of the anesthetic agents, are functioning properly. If congenital or age related abnormalities are identified, anesthesia protocols can be modified. If all is normal, we have established a valuable baseline for future reference.

What pain medications will my cat receive?
Because it is not full abdominal surgery, cats recover more quickly from neutering than from spaying, and with significantly less pain. Initially, an injection of a morphine-like drug is given as part of the pre-anesthetic medication. The effect lasts approximately 12 hours. In addition, lidocaine (similar to novacaine) is injected close to the surgical site to provide a local anesthetic. That evening, when the cat is re-examined, if he seems uncomfortable he will be sent home with additional oral pain medication.

How can all this be done for such a reasonable cost?
In an effort to reduce the number of unwanted puppies and kittens, the Livonia Veterinary Hospital has subsidized the cost of your cat’s neuter. Another comparably involved surgery would certainly be more, and comparable human procedures would cost thousands more. It is important to note, however, that even with the costs reduced, your cat has received the best veterinary care possible. We perform the procedure using the highest standards available today to minimize the risk of infection and make the procedure as pain free as possible. You can be assured that high quality veterinary care is never compromised at the Livonia Veterinary Hospital.

Should I do anything special when my cat comes home?
For 2-3 days after surgery, you should keep your cat’s activity restricted, and he should not be allowed to go outdoors.

He may be a little quiet and sleep more than usual the first day or two. After all, he is recovering from surgery!

The first evening home we recommend feeding only a partial meal. Afterwards, you may feed and water your cat as usual. No special diet is required.

You should examine the incision daily. There is no need for suture removal; the small incisions heal without sutures.

We encourage you to contact us if you have any questions or concerns.

The hormonal changes that result from neutering occur over time, so typical pre-neuter behaviors, such as roaming, may still be present up to 3 months after surgery.

What is involved in spaying my pet?
  • Assuming the pre-op blood work reveals no underlying problems, a pre-anesthetic injection with pain medication is administered.
  • A small area of the front leg is shaved and an IV catheter is then placed for administering fluids and medications.
  • The endotracheal tube (for breathing) is placed for inhalation anesthesia.
  • As your pet’s heart and breathing are monitored by a licensed veterinary technician, another clips the surgical site.
  • As the surgeon scrubs and “gowns up,” the patient is moved to the surgery table; the incision site is scrubbed and sterilized.
  • The patient is connected to our multi-modal monitor, and anesthesia is adjusted and closely monitored.
  • A small incision is made in the abdominal belly wall, and the surgery begins. The entire surgical procedure takes approximately 30-45 minutes.
  • The Y shaped uterus and ovaries are removed. (We’ll spare you the details here!)
  • After reapposing (closing) the 3 layers with absorbable suture, the patient is transferred to recovery, where she is closely watched until her endotracheal tube can be safely removed and she is in sternal recumbancy (lying on her chest).
  • It is at this time that we usually call to assure you that all has gone well.
  • Cleaning and sterilizing the operating room and surgical instruments then begins in preparation for the next surgery.
  • When the patient is awake and able to walk, she is transferred to a hospital ward kennel, and is regularly checked.
  • Later that day, when the doctor examines the patient, she is given more pain medication that will last an additional 12 – 24 hours. At the doctor’s discretion, she may be given a small meal.
  • The following morning, she is again examined by the doctor, the incision is checked and she is given a small meal.
  • It will soon be time to go home! A discharge appointment is scheduled for later that day.

Why are I.V. fluids included?
As with human surgeries, intravenous fluid therapy is an integral part of anesthetic procedures at the Honeoye Falls Veterinary Hospital. Anesthesia can lower blood pressure during any surgery. The intravenous fluids increase blood volume, thereby maintaining your pet’s blood pressure at a safer level. In addition, should drugs be required in the rare instance of an emergency, the indwelling catheter provides us immediate IV access.

What pain medications will my dog or cat receive?
Initially, an injection of a morphine-like drug is given as part of the pre-anesthetic medication. The effect lasts approximately 12 hours. That evening when the patient is re-examined, another injection of the same pain medication is given.

Initially, an injection of a morphine-like drug is given as part of the pre-anesthetic medications. This provides pain relief for approximately 12 hours. And if at any time during their recovery period they seem painful, additional opiate and/or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are administered. That evening, when the patient is re-examined, another injection of the same pain medication is given. We are confident that our pain management regime provides as much relief as possible from any discomfort your pet might otherwise experience during the post-operative period.

When the above pain management protocol was initially recommended by the AVMA, it was used here on a trial basis. Drs. Jamison were so impressed by how well pets recovered, and how obviously more comfortable the patients were post operatively, that they quickly made it standard procedure.

Why is pre-operative blood work required? (My pet is young and healthy.)
Pre-op blood work provides the same benefits as with human surgery. The tests check for anemia, and tell us if your pet’s internal organs, particularly those associated with the metabolism of the anesthetic agents, are functioning properly. If congenital or age related abnormalities are identified, anesthesia protocols can be modified. If all is normal, we have established a valuable baseline for future reference.

How can all this be done for such a reasonable cost?
In an effort to reduce the number of unwanted puppies and kittens, the Honeoye Falls Veterinary Hospital has subsidized the cost of your pet’s spay or neuter. Other similar abdominal procedures would cost much more, and comparable human procedures would cost thousands more.

It is important to note, however, that even with the costs reduced, your pet has received the best veterinary care possible. We perform the procedure using the highest standards available today to minimize the risk of infection and make the procedure as pain free as possible. You can be assured that high quality veterinary care is never compromised at Honeoye Falls Veterinary Hospital.

Should I do anything special when my dog or cat comes home?

  • For a week or so after surgery, you should keep your pet’s activity restricted, though walks are fine. Do not encourage running, jumping, and other active play.
  • She may be a little quiet and sleep more than usual the first day or two. After all, she is recovering from major abdominal surgery!
  • You may feed and water your pet as you do usually. No special diet is required.
  • You will need to examine the incision daily. Absorbable sutures are used so there is no need to return for suture removal.
  • Don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions or concerns.
There is much controversy regarding Internet pharmacies and whether they are a good choice for pet owners. Here’s why we are hesitant to endorse their use:

  1. Manufacturers sell only to veterinarians, therefore we know the product IS genuine. Internet pharmacies buy from many sources, including overseas. Storage temperatures, expiration dates, and the true manufacturer (though the package may look the same) are often unknown.
  2. Products purchased from a veterinarian are guaranteed. If your pet has an adverse reaction, the manufacturer will take responsibility for the cost of care – not true if purchased online or at a pet store.
  3. We offer product education and oversee your pet’s health. Our staff can address your questions and advise on produce use. Our doctors are required by the AVMA to have examined your pet within 12 months, to minimize the risk inherent with any medication.
  4. Lawsuits against Internet pharmacies have been filed for multiple reasons, including selling counterfeit product.

To encourage you to buy from us, thereby ensuring your pet’s safety, we have lowered our prices on flea and heartworm preventatives, as well as some foods and medications. However, sometimes we just cannot compete with the buying power the big Internet companies and national chain pet stores. We understand that everyone must stay within a budget, so if you find a significant price difference and still desire to buy a prescription medication online, a doctor will write the prescription, provided your pet has been examined within the last year.

When making your decision, please remember that we offer a well trained staff, the manufacturer’s guarantee, and a concern for your pet that you will not find online.

Got Questions?

It is unlikely that a healthy, adult, pet dog will develop the severe and deadly form of canine influenza virus.

Overall, canine influenza is no more a threat to your dog than an infection from Bordetella (the bacteria associated with “kennel cough”). While it’s true that about 80% of all dogs exposed to the virus will become infected, the vast majority of these experience mild symptoms similar to a human head cold which resolve with simple supportive care. About 20% of those dogs exposed will clear the infection without any signs of illness.

Infected dogs may develop such clinical signs as coughing, sneezing, lethargy, decreased appetite, fever and a runny nose.

Often mild symptoms such as coughing and sneezing can resolve themselves after just a few days. If treatment is warranted, then supportive care consisting of antibiotics, and possibly intravenous fluids and hospitalization, would be indicated. A very small percentage of dogs can develop pneumonia, which requires more aggressive therapy.

How is canine influenza spread?
Canine influenza is very easily spread from dog to dog. An infected dog can spread the virus for a day or so before acting sick. This makes it very difficult to prevent and stop outbreaks. Anything the dog coughs on or licks (bowls, blankets, toys etc) might also spread infection. People can accidentally spread canine flu when they touch an infected dog and then touch other dogs or objects before washing their hands.

What dogs are at risk?
Shelter dogs and racing greyhounds are at a greater risk of contracting the severe form of canine influenza, due to the close proximity of their crates and the increased stress levels these dogs experience. This also applies to dogs staying at a boarding kennel or participating in dog shows. As with human flu, the very young or very old are also at increased risk.

In its severe form, canine influenza is characterized by a rapid onset of hemorrhagic pneumonia with high fevers, difficulty breathing and coughing up blood. In these cases death can occur within four to six hours of presentation. Again, it is rare that a healthy, adult, pet dog will develop the severe form of this viral infection. It is important to remember that, even in these very high-risk populations, the mortality rate is only 5-8%. That means that almost all dogs affected do recover with treatment.

Can I prevent my dog from getting the flu?

    1. You can help protect your dog with these simple preventive steps:

    2. At the dog park or doggie day care, avoid any contact with dogs that are coughing and sneezing.
    3. Keep a watchful eye out: If your dog starts coughing or sneezing and acting lethargic, see your veterinarian to discuss diagnostic and treatment options.
    4. If your dog shows any of these upper respiratory signs, limit your dog’s socializing — steer clear of the dog park and doggie day care until these symptoms are gone to avoid exposing other dogs.
    5. If you anticipate boarding your dog, you may want to consider vaccinating, especially if your dog has underlying issues, is very young or is a “senior citizen.”

Should my dog be vaccinated?
If you anticipate boarding your dog, you may want to consider vaccinating, especially if your dog has underlying issues, is very young or is a “senior citizen”. These dogs are at greater risk.

Be aware that the vaccine may not prevent your pet from becoming infected if exposed to the virus. However, it has been shown that the vaccination will reduce the severity of clinical signs.

Given these facts, we feel that if your dog is in a high risk group, strong consideration should be given to vaccinating against canine influenza.

If I choose to vaccinate, how soon should it be done before my dog is near other dogs?
If you decide vaccinate, please note that the vaccine requires two initial vaccinations, 2 – 4 weeks apart, to establish protection. Significant protection is likely not established until 7-10 days after the second immunization. Therefore, you must plan ahead for the vaccine to provide any preventative effect.

If you expect to board your dog(s) regularly, and you choose to vaccinate against influenza, you might consider adding it to your dog’s annual vaccine protocol. Because we will be evaluating each dog’s potential risk individually, be sure to discuss this with the veterinarian.

Why should I consider Pet Health Insurance?
We all want what is best for our pets, and there are incredible veterinary services to choose from today. By taking full advantage of these care options, your pet can live a longer, healthier life. Insurance can help cover your costs for care, and may enable you to choose more complete care. When you do a little research, you will soon see that pet insurance is very different from our health insurance, and does not have the same disadvantages!

Most pets will encounter one or more major medical issues in their lifetimes, so pet insurance warrants serious consideration. For detailed information, visit the website of companies you are considering, or talk with a rep from that company.

Not All Pet Insurance Companies Are the Same….
The following information outlines key points pertaining to pet health insurance, and serves as a guide for some of the questions to ask when considering a pet insurance plan. We have researched several companies, and have found many variations. What will fit the needs of one pet or owner might not work for another. To help you in your decision, we have outlined some important points to consider and research when looking into insurance.
Pet Health Insurance compared to human health insurance and HMOs:

  • They are designed very differently. Pet insurance is more like auto or dental insurance, and is often endorsed by general insurance companies.
  • The owner pays the veterinarian, and then is reimbursed by the insurance company.
  • Claim forms and the vet invoice are mailed to the insurance company; most forms are short and easy to complete
  • Most plans allow you to choose any veterinarian.

What does it cost?

  • Annual premiums vary, depending on the plan, and sometimes on the age of the pet.
  • There are copays, and usually a deductible before the insurance reimburses you.
  • Average monthly premiums for mid-range coverage illness plans – $15 – 35 per month
  • Average monthly premiums for wellness plans – $10 – 30 per month
  • Some companies give multi pet discounts; some companies offer a 30 day free trial.
Deductibles:
  • All illness and accident plans have deductibles
  • Some companies allow you to choose the amount – from $50 – $500.
  • Generally, the higher the deductible, the lower the premium.
  • Some deductibles are per incident or illness, some are per year.
Reimbursement-There are two types, depending on the company:
  • Reimbursement based on % of actual vet invoice – usually 80-90%
  • Based on benefit schedule (pre-determined “acceptable” vet fee schedule)

Typical Exclusions:

  • Cosmetic procedures (ear crops; tail docks; dewclaws, though not necessarily cosmetic)
  • Pregnancy
  • OFA and health certifications
  • Pre-existing conditions
  • Anal glands
  • Parasites – prevention and treatment, internal and external
  • Sometimes inherited conditions
  • Congenital problems – present at birth
  • Prescription foods
  • At least one company excludes prescriptions (requires a separate rider)
  • Medical conditions that are common in certain breeds are often excluded – the insurance company will provide specifics if you ask.
  • ** Some companies offer add-on riders to cover some of the above conditions.
  • ** Some companies will provide limited “flat rate” coverage for the above conditions.

Wellness exams, vaccinations, etc.

  • Staying current on wellness exams and vaccines can help prevent or lessen the severity of illness.
  • Most companies offer separate “wellness” coverage for a separate premium.
  • Partial reimbursement is the general rule (40-70%) with no deductibles.
  • Disciplined owners can also save for these procedures, since, unlike illnesses, owners can plan for this expense.
Average Waiting Periods:
There is always a waiting period after signing up, which varies with the company.

  • · Cruciate repair – 6 – 12 mo.
  • · Illness – 14 – 30 days
  • · Recurring illness (e.g. ear infection or UTI)- free of the illness for 6 – 12 mo.
  • · Accident – 2 – 14 days
The bottom line: We feel pet insurance can greatly benefit your pet and his/her quality and length of life. Remember, it is primarily for unexpected expenses and can greatly reduce potential economic strain for you. For more details, we advise you to visit the websites of the companies you are considering, and then call the company with your questions.

What is involved in neutering my cat?
  • Assuming the pre-op blood work reveals no underlying problems, a pre-anesthetic injection that includes pain medication is administered.
  • A breathing mask is then placed over the cat’s face to induce and maintain full anesthesia.
  • The surgery site is clipped and aseptically prepared for surgery. At this time local anesthetic blocks are used to further prevent discomfort. All the while the heart, respiratory rate, and other vital parameters are closely monitored by a NYS licensed veterinary technician.
  • As the surgeon scrubs and “gowns up,” the patient is carefully moved to the surgery table where he is reconnected to the anesthetic monitoring equipment.
  • A small incision is made, and the surgery begins.
  • We’ll save you the details, but the appropriate organs are surgically removed.
  • After surgery completion, the patient is removed from anesthesia and transferred to the recovery area where he is closely observed until he is lying up on his chest. It is at this time that we will try to call to assure you that all has gone well, and to schedule your cat’s discharge appt.
  • When the patient is awake and able to walk, he is transferred to the hospital ward, and is frequently checked.
  • Later that day, the doctor re-examines the patient and inspects the incision.
  • As the pain medication from the morning wears off, it is determined whether an oral pain medication should be sent home with your cat.
  • It will soon be time to go home!

Why is pre-operative blood work recommended? (My cat is young and healthy.)
Pre-op blood work provides the same benefits as with human surgery. The tests check for anemia, and tell us if your cat’s organs, particularly those associated with the metabolism of the anesthetic agents, are functioning properly. If congenital or age related abnormalities are identified, anesthesia protocols can be modified. If all is normal, we have established a valuable baseline for future reference.

What pain medications will my cat receive?
Because it is not full abdominal surgery, cats recover more quickly from neutering than from spaying, and with significantly less pain. Initially, an injection of a morphine-like drug is given as part of the pre-anesthetic medication. The effect lasts approximately 12 hours. In addition, lidocaine (similar to novacaine) is injected close to the surgical site to provide a local anesthetic. That evening, when the cat is re-examined, if he seems uncomfortable he will be sent home with additional oral pain medication.

How can all this be done for such a reasonable cost?
In an effort to reduce the number of unwanted puppies and kittens, the Livonia Veterinary Hospital has subsidized the cost of your cat’s neuter. Another comparably involved surgery would certainly be more, and comparable human procedures would cost thousands more. It is important to note, however, that even with the costs reduced, your cat has received the best veterinary care possible. We perform the procedure using the highest standards available today to minimize the risk of infection and make the procedure as pain free as possible. You can be assured that high quality veterinary care is never compromised at the Livonia Veterinary Hospital.

Should I do anything special when my cat comes home?
For 2-3 days after surgery, you should keep your cat’s activity restricted, and he should not be allowed to go outdoors.

He may be a little quiet and sleep more than usual the first day or two. After all, he is recovering from surgery!

The first evening home we recommend feeding only a partial meal. Afterwards, you may feed and water your cat as usual. No special diet is required.

You should examine the incision daily. There is no need for suture removal; the small incisions heal without sutures.

We encourage you to contact us if you have any questions or concerns.

The hormonal changes that result from neutering occur over time, so typical pre-neuter behaviors, such as roaming, may still be present up to 3 months after surgery.

What is involved in neutering my cat?
    • Assuming the pre-op blood work reveals no underlying problems, a pre-anesthetic injection with pain medication is given.
    • A small area of the front leg is shaved and an IV catheter is then placed for administering fluids and medications.
    • The endotracheal (breathing) tube is placed for inhalation anesthesia.
    • As your dog’s heart and breathing are monitored by a NYS licensed veterinary technician, another clips the surgical site.
    • As the surgeon scrubs and “gowns up,” the patient is moved to the surgery table; the incision site is scrubbed and sterilized.
    • The patient is connected to a respiratory monitor, and anesthesia is adjusted and monitored.
    • A small incision is made, and the surgery begins, which takes approximately 45 minutes.
    • The testicles are surgically removed. (We’ll spare you the details here!)
    • After closing the 2 layers with absorbable suture, the patient is transferred to the observation area where he is closely watched until his endotracheal tube can be safely removed and he is in sternal recumbancy (lying up on his chest).
    • It is at this time that we usually call to assure you that all has gone well, and to schedule your dog’s discharge appt.
    • Cleaning and sterilization of the operating room and surgical instruments then begins to prepare for the next surgery.
    • When the patient is awake and able to walk, he is transferred to a hospital ward kennel, and is regularly checked.
    • Later that day, the doctor examines the patient and inspects the incision.

As the pain medication from the morning wears off, it is determined whether an oral pain medication should be sent home with your dog.
It will soon be time to go home!

Why is pre-operative blood work recommended? (My cat is young and healthy.)
Pre-op blood work provides the same benefits as with human surgery. The tests check for anemia, and tell us if your cat’s organs, particularly those associated with the metabolism of the anesthetic agents, are functioning properly. If congenital or age related abnormalities are identified, anesthesia protocols can be modified. If all is normal, we have established a valuable baseline for future reference.

What pain medications will my cat receive?
Because it is not full abdominal surgery, cats recover more quickly from neutering than from spaying, and with significantly less pain. Initially, an injection of a morphine-like drug is given as part of the pre-anesthetic medication. The effect lasts approximately 12 hours. In addition, lidocaine (similar to novacaine) is injected close to the surgical site to provide a local anesthetic. That evening, when the cat is re-examined, if he seems uncomfortable he will be sent home with additional oral pain medication.

How can all this be done for such a reasonable cost?
In an effort to reduce the number of unwanted puppies and kittens, the Livonia Veterinary Hospital has subsidized the cost of your cat’s neuter. Another comparably involved surgery would certainly be more, and comparable human procedures would cost thousands more. It is important to note, however, that even with the costs reduced, your cat has received the best veterinary care possible. We perform the procedure using the highest standards available today to minimize the risk of infection and make the procedure as pain free as possible. You can be assured that high quality veterinary care is never compromised at the Livonia Veterinary Hospital.

Should I do anything special when my cat comes home?
For 2-3 days after surgery, you should keep your cat’s activity restricted, and he should not be allowed to go outdoors.

He may be a little quiet and sleep more than usual the first day or two. After all, he is recovering from surgery!

The first evening home we recommend feeding only a partial meal. Afterwards, you may feed and water your cat as usual. No special diet is required.

You should examine the incision daily. There is no need for suture removal; the small incisions heal without sutures.

We encourage you to contact us if you have any questions or concerns.

The hormonal changes that result from neutering occur over time, so typical pre-neuter behaviors, such as roaming, may still be present up to 3 months after surgery.

What is involved in spaying my pet?
  • Assuming the pre-op blood work reveals no underlying problems, a pre-anesthetic injection with pain medication is administered.
  • A small area of the front leg is shaved and an IV catheter is then placed for administering fluids and medications.
  • The endotracheal tube (for breathing) is placed for inhalation anesthesia.
  • As your pet’s heart and breathing are monitored by a licensed veterinary technician, another clips the surgical site.
  • As the surgeon scrubs and “gowns up,” the patient is moved to the surgery table; the incision site is scrubbed and sterilized.
  • The patient is connected to our multi-modal monitor, and anesthesia is adjusted and closely monitored.
  • A small incision is made in the abdominal belly wall, and the surgery begins. The entire surgical procedure takes approximately 30-45 minutes.
  • The Y shaped uterus and ovaries are removed. (We’ll spare you the details here!)
  • After reapposing (closing) the 3 layers with absorbable suture, the patient is transferred to recovery, where she is closely watched until her endotracheal tube can be safely removed and she is in sternal recumbancy (lying on her chest).
  • It is at this time that we usually call to assure you that all has gone well.
  • Cleaning and sterilizing the operating room and surgical instruments then begins in preparation for the next surgery.
  • When the patient is awake and able to walk, she is transferred to a hospital ward kennel, and is regularly checked.
  • Later that day, when the doctor examines the patient, she is given more pain medication that will last an additional 12 – 24 hours. At the doctor’s discretion, she may be given a small meal.
  • The following morning, she is again examined by the doctor, the incision is checked and she is given a small meal.
  • It will soon be time to go home! A discharge appointment is scheduled for later that day.

Why are I.V. fluids included?
As with human surgeries, intravenous fluid therapy is an integral part of anesthetic procedures at the Honeoye Falls Veterinary Hospital. Anesthesia can lower blood pressure during any surgery. The intravenous fluids increase blood volume, thereby maintaining your pet’s blood pressure at a safer level. In addition, should drugs be required in the rare instance of an emergency, the indwelling catheter provides us immediate IV access.

What pain medications will my dog or cat receive?
Initially, an injection of a morphine-like drug is given as part of the pre-anesthetic medication. The effect lasts approximately 12 hours. That evening when the patient is re-examined, another injection of the same pain medication is given.

Initially, an injection of a morphine-like drug is given as part of the pre-anesthetic medications. This provides pain relief for approximately 12 hours. And if at any time during their recovery period they seem painful, additional opiate and/or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are administered. That evening, when the patient is re-examined, another injection of the same pain medication is given. We are confident that our pain management regime provides as much relief as possible from any discomfort your pet might otherwise experience during the post-operative period.

When the above pain management protocol was initially recommended by the AVMA, it was used here on a trial basis. Drs. Jamison were so impressed by how well pets recovered, and how obviously more comfortable the patients were post operatively, that they quickly made it standard procedure.

Why is pre-operative blood work required? (My pet is young and healthy.)
Pre-op blood work provides the same benefits as with human surgery. The tests check for anemia, and tell us if your pet’s internal organs, particularly those associated with the metabolism of the anesthetic agents, are functioning properly. If congenital or age related abnormalities are identified, anesthesia protocols can be modified. If all is normal, we have established a valuable baseline for future reference.

How can all this be done for such a reasonable cost?
In an effort to reduce the number of unwanted puppies and kittens, the Honeoye Falls Veterinary Hospital has subsidized the cost of your pet’s spay or neuter. Other similar abdominal procedures would cost much more, and comparable human procedures would cost thousands more.

It is important to note, however, that even with the costs reduced, your pet has received the best veterinary care possible. We perform the procedure using the highest standards available today to minimize the risk of infection and make the procedure as pain free as possible. You can be assured that high quality veterinary care is never compromised at Honeoye Falls Veterinary Hospital.

Should I do anything special when my dog or cat comes home?

  • For a week or so after surgery, you should keep your pet’s activity restricted, though walks are fine. Do not encourage running, jumping, and other active play.
  • She may be a little quiet and sleep more than usual the first day or two. After all, she is recovering from major abdominal surgery!
  • You may feed and water your pet as you do usually. No special diet is required.
  • You will need to examine the incision daily. Absorbable sutures are used so there is no need to return for suture removal.
  • Don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions or concerns.
There is much controversy regarding Internet pharmacies and whether they are a good choice for pet owners. Here’s why we are hesitant to endorse their use:

  1. Manufacturers sell only to veterinarians, therefore we know the product IS genuine. Internet pharmacies buy from many sources, including overseas. Storage temperatures, expiration dates, and the true manufacturer (though the package may look the same) are often unknown.
  2. Products purchased from a veterinarian are guaranteed. If your pet has an adverse reaction, the manufacturer will take responsibility for the cost of care – not true if purchased online or at a pet store.
  3. We offer product education and oversee your pet’s health. Our staff can address your questions and advise on produce use. Our doctors are required by the AVMA to have examined your pet within 12 months, to minimize the risk inherent with any medication.
  4. Lawsuits against Internet pharmacies have been filed for multiple reasons, including selling counterfeit product.

To encourage you to buy from us, thereby ensuring your pet’s safety, we have lowered our prices on flea and heartworm preventatives, as well as some foods and medications. However, sometimes we just cannot compete with the buying power the big Internet companies and national chain pet stores. We understand that everyone must stay within a budget, so if you find a significant price difference and still desire to buy a prescription medication online, a doctor will write the prescription, provided your pet has been examined within the last year.

When making your decision, please remember that we offer a well trained staff, the manufacturer’s guarantee, and a concern for your pet that you will not find online.